How to Tell Customers What They Want to Hear

May 26, 2011
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When promoting your product to customers, they will ultimately want to know what is in it for them more than wanting to know how successful your company and/or product has been. Therefore, when promoting your product, share with customers the necessities: the benefits for them and why wasting their time listening to you is worthwhile. Dale Carnegie states that a key to success is to talk in terms of the other person’s interests. It is important to stay focused “talking about the points that are important to the client, not those that aren’t.” Try to stick to the topics listed below when trying to satisfy customers.

  • Think about the customer’s preferences: Make sure the benefits of your product are not things you deem as important. Make sure you have considered what may be important to each client, individually. Each customer, even if they are from the same background or from similar situations, may differ in what they prefer out of a product. Remember to keep an open mind and be flexible!
  • Try to fulfill the customer’s wishes: Fulfilling customer wishes can be a hard promise to make, especially if the wishes are impossible to make come true. You do not have to be the customer’s genie in a bottle, but giving them even a bit of false hope (within reason) will instill their faith in your company and your product you are promoting.
  • Always remember the customer’s feelings: The satisfaction your product gives to a customer is obviously important, but the feelings a customer has towards you, your company, and anything associated with your company. Therefore, the first impressions, compliments, and vibe you give off to a customer could eventually make or break a sale. Be helpful and friendly but use discretion; just as being friendly can help lure customers in, being overly helpful can steer them away.

Society’s moral code tells us that we should never tell a white lie and always speak the truth. In some cases, though, that can be bent, within reason. Telling customers what they want to hear can make or break a sale for you and if you keep in mind the topics above, doing so will be easier on your conscious. Bottom line: use good judgment when telling a customer what they want to hear. Do not dig yourself into a lie or promise that you cannot fulfill nor come back from. Feel free to share your stories of experience or leave comments, opinions, and concerns below!

This post is brought to you by the good folks at Dale Carnegie Training of Alabama, providers of professional development and management development courses and information in Huntsville, Alabama. We would love to connect with you on Facebook and Twitter @DaleCarnegieALA.

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